Category Archives: Tips from the Field

Brown Spots in the Lawn

As we all know, we’re currently experiencing drought conditions and many lawns are suffering from the effects of little to no rain. This can appear as brown spots in the lawn. It is very important to check your irrigation system to ensure proper volume and coverage.

Brown Spots in the lawn
Check your lawn for drought

Sprinkler gears and gaskets do wear out. Often we find brown spots in the lawns where the sprinkler heads start to miss and the lawn turns brown. We also have “hot spots” in our lawns which may require us to add a little extra water. This can be done by hand watering those areas.

A common issue we find is when the power goes out, the timer will sometime reset to the factory setting so be sure to double check it. This can definitely contribute to the lack of water and to the brown spots in your lawn.

Here’s George Richardson, Technical Director, to tell you a little more about drought and these brown spots, and what to do if you think your lawn is suffering from it.

If you problem is NOT drought, let us help you keep your lawn pest free, healthy & green! Our Winter Lawn Program suppresses weeds even when your lawn is dormant in the winter. Spring calls for a pH check of your soil and then adding lime, if needed. Lime application will assist in the uptake of the fertilizer that is applied as your lawn begins to Green Up. Peninsular’s Turf Quality Management Program is individualized, giving your lawn the proper combination of fertilization, insect and weed control at just the right time. We also provide treatment for shrubs! Our prompt courteous service is always guaranteed.

We proudly service clients in Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Ponte Vedra, Fleming Island, Orange Park, Green Cove Springs, Middleburg, World Golf Village, St. Johns, St. Augustine, Mandarin, Baldwin, Fernandina Beach, Fernandina, Amelia Island, Yulee, Callahan, Macclenny, Florida

Flying Ants vs. Termite Swarmers

Are these ants or termites?

Here is a VIDEO below that will show you the distinct difference between the flying ant and a swarming termite.

Termite swarmers

If there is any way to capture one of the insects and preserve them for Peninsular, that would be the best approach. Flying Ants are often confused with Termite Swarmers. Although both can be annoying, it’s most important to monitor and treat your home for termites if the winged insect is a swarmer.

Flying ants

There are several distinct differences between the Ants and Termites. Flying Ants Flying Ants have a pinched waist and Termite Swarmers have a straight waist. Flying Ants have bent antenna and Termite Swarmers have straight antenna. Ants have larger front wings while Termites have wings of the same size. A diagram of the difference between the two insects is visible on the YouTube video below.

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If you cannot tell the difference between the flying ant and termite, Peninsular will gladly come out to your home and inspect for you and give you a free estimate on treatment. There are two types of termite treatments to choose from: Termidor® and Sentricon®.

The DIFFERENCE between the two will be explained by the service technician. It’s important to know if you are seeing a flying ant or termite. Immediately protect your home if what you are seeing are Termite Swarmers. Swarmers in the air usually indicate that a Termite Colony is nearby. The Swarmers don’t do the actual damage, that is the job of the subterranean termites. The other member of the termite colony is the soldier who is defending the colony and the Queen.

ASK THE CRITTER GITTER

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Ask the Critter Gitter

David S.

Jacksonville Beach, FL

I have noticed areas of my lawn are turning brown and appear to be dying? What do you think the problem is?

Customers often call the office for help with their dying lawn. They complain that areas of the yard are brown and look dried out.

George Richardson, Technical Director for Peninsular Pest Control, will show you how to simply check your lawn for drought damage.

https://www.coj.net/welcome/news/time-for-duval-county-residents-to-change-lawn-irr

The City of Jacksonville Environmental Quality Division reminds Duval County residents that as they set their clocks forward one hour on Sunday, March 13th for Daylight Savings Time, they may once again set lawn and landscape irrigation to no more than two days per week. Designed to conserve Jacksonville’s water supply and reduce the amount of nutrients flowing into the St. Johns River, Chapter 366 of the City’s Ordinance Code limits watering to two days a week during Daylight Savings Time

Residential properties with an address that ends in an odd number or places without an address may water on Wednesday and Saturday and those addresses which end in an even number may water on Thursday and Sunday.  Non-residential irrigation is only permitted on Tuesday and Friday.


 
Visit coj.net/fertilizer for more information including exceptions to the schedule, penalties and enforcement.

*An odd number address is a street address whereby the numeric part of the address is an odd number (103 John Doe Street) or the alpha-numeric part of the address ends with any of the letters N-Z (104-N John Doe Street).   

**An even number address is a street address whereby the numeric part of the address is an even number (108 John Doe Street) or the alpha-numeric part of the street address ends with any of the letters A-M (109A John Doe Street).
 

New Florida Homeowner?

Know this before buying a home in Florida

What’s eating my lawn?

Rich Jones, Host of WOKV’s Morning Show, asks the question and George Richardson responds. George Richardson, Technical Director for Peninsular Pest Control, shows you how to determine if you have chinch bugs or mole crickets in your lawn.